Pec Minor Dysfunction (continued from the Pec Minor assessment)

Why is it that the pec minor is often the case according to the pec minor assessment video? Well, there are a variety of reasons but a few major ones come to mind. First, we (including myself) are often stuck in flexion for most of the day (think shoulder slouched over or hunched over position). Think about the amount of time we spend in this position (sitting on the couch, at the computer, playing video games, 7-8 40+mins periods in a classroom, at a desk at work, even when we eat) and it is easy to see how strongly this can affect posture and in this case the shortening of the pec minor. Secondly, let us not forget how much horizontal pressing guys do in the gym which is also going to significantly affect the pec minor (guilty as charged in the past).

By looking at this picture you can see that if the pec minor were to become restricted (tight) it would pull forward on the coracoid process causing an anteriorly tilted scapula. The pec minor also assists the levator scapulae and rhomboids in downwardly rotating the scapula. This is extremely important because if there are restrictions here then it will prevent proper upward rotation of the scapula which is needed for any type of pain free overhead movements . The pec minor assessment video gives good examples of how this can affect other exercises (horizontal pulling, using overhead movements) and thus shoulder health because the scapula is not allowed the retraction as well as upward rotation it needs to keep optimal shoulder health.
The next videos (from Tony Gentilcore and Eric Cressey’s youtube pages) can offer some insight into soft tissue work(with tennis or lacrosse ball) for the pec minor (although a good manual therapist would be the best) and an improper rowing pattern.


Improper Rowing Pattern ..notice that the shoulder stays fixed in one position by just “muscling it with the arm” where it should retract back, instead we get a hyperextension at the shoulder as well as chin protrusion which is also a compensatory motion for lack of thoracic extension.



Categories: Injury Prevention

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