The Role of the Strength Coach/ Joint By Joint Theory @ Rowan University

I recently finished up speaking around 45 minutes at Rowan University.  It was for their chapter in the National Wellness Institute (NWI) group where approximately 20 or so students showed up.  I was surprised at how well it went considering at the beginning I almost crapped myself (we could not log on to use the powerpoint slides so I was just going to have to wing it). The Powerpoint presentation I created was my opinion on information that I thought would apply some form of practical information for those possibly interested in strength &conditioning/athletic development etc… Basically, it was my opinion on what the role of the strength coach is and our philosophy (joint by joint approach).  I understand there are many overlapping systems that can be more thoroughly understood by reading Kevin’s blog on regional interdependence.  We actually were able to get the powerpoint fired up and it went better then expected.  This was something that I think needs to be understood from almost all trainers in whatever field and something that I have learned from reading the likes of Mike Boyle, Kevin, and other leading strength coaches in the field.

Besides the joint by joint approach which everyone can take a read at T-nation.com, our role of the strength coach is this and exactly in this order…

1. Do No Harm

  • This starts with assessment, if you do not have one…find one (FMS, Assess and Correct, PRI)
  • Do not train till technical failure
  • Appropriate exercise selection (indicative of the assessment)
  • If something hurts, stop, and find something else

2. Decrease the risk for injury in the weightroom and then on the field/ice/court etc…

  • Weight room incidents should almost never happen
  • There are exceptions like freak accidents but if you are allowing athletes to stand on a bosu ball and squat, or doing something inappropriate for the athletes/clients..it needs to stop
  • Think common sense

3. Improve performance

  • Is it odd that this is third?  I think not, if you cannot play because of injury then what is the point of off-season preparation?  Do things with a planned progression, allowing people to move well first before they move fast, hard, or strong is of utmost importance

Cheers,

Matt



Categories: Core Training, Injury Prevention

Tags: , , , ,

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