Addressing The Mistakes in Training

Two nights ago while closing up Endeavor, one of our coaches was talking to our two interns about strategies to help improve cueing to our athletes out of incorrect form.  There is no “one” cue that is universal for each individual but there are many that help the majority.  One simple way to look at cueing is to cue the biggest mistake in a particular movement.  A few years ago when I started teaching athletes movements I would over cue.  Even till this day I am trying to find more effective ways to help an athlete achieve proper movement in the least amount of time.  Take a look at the picture below, this is a common mistake…

valgus

 

We see this pattern on a regular basis with new clients who come into our facility.  However, during squatting, hinging, or single leg training (if I see this) would it make for a more effective movement if I cued all of the following at once: “chest up, butt back, knees out, sit on your heels, stay tall?” Maybe, but it can save valuable time and be extremely efficient to cue the major flaw.  There is even a science behind cueing that helps athletes grasp movements that I honestly didn’t know about.  Check out the article below as it goes into detail on internal and external cueing…

The Science and Application of Coaching Cues

In summary, coaching/teaching movement becomes much easier by…

  1. Using the least amount of words to teach a lift
  2. Coach the flaw when you see a  movement issue
  3. Think — KISS (keep it simple stupid)

Cheers,

Matt



Categories: Strength Training

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